you

Interesting articles, stories, news. Views on happenings. Current activities, ideas and events. International and Australian affairs - scientific, cultural, political, economic, sociological, anthropological, archaeological and historical environment.



Where Is the Internet Going?

There isn't much doubt that mobile devices will soon outnumber the fixed PC. It is surprising that it has taken so long. People are tripping over each other to make pre-orders on the iPhone. There will probably be a rush for Microsoft's new offerings. In recent years Google's Android products have been racing forward, generally at the expense of Microsoft, not Apple.

Web developers are slowly making a change as well. Old "easy" website building is a thing of the past. It seems websites have to provide a "traditional" PC type website and have another built-in for mobile devices. There must be an automatic link in the main website so that only the smaller site is sent to mobiles. Though many users have said they prefer looking at traditional sites with a small handheld, even though it means moving around a page to see all the info, download times are just too long for this to continue.

HTML5 was envisaged to make it easier for developers, standardizing code. The opposite has happened. Infighting has occurred between the Internet powers that be in the US and developers choosing to go their own way. They don't like to hear that their good ideas have been dropped by the controlling body. Up to six web architectures are doing the rounds on mobiles. This makes writing apps so complex that it rules out simple web building by the home web builder. New web building software will have to be capable in so many areas. This will make the software program download huge - and expensive.

The Internet is moving inevitably forward. Data cloud services have made smaller devices possible. Storing things actually on a mobile is no longer necessary. We will have to wait and see if the new fixed system RT from Microsoft is broadly accepted. How many customers will buy something that will only run Microsoft software fixed at the time of purchase? The market could get angry.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internet
TwitThis